Creating colored QR Codes during a Data Merge

Since Adobe InDesign CC, users have been able to create QR codes directly in InDesign. With the release of InDesign CC 2014, the Data Merge feature was upgraded to import variable QR codes based on data in the source file.

One bug-bear was that QR codes generated during a data merge could only have a black fill, and there was no way to change the color during the merge. One solution is to merge to an InDesign file and post-process the QR codes by changing the colors manually in each code, but if a file contains hundreds – or thousands of QR codes, then this is not an option.

My solution was to create a script that would create the variable QR codes with the appropriate colors first, but save them as images but linked to an updated version of the database that contains an additional field for the newly colored QR code images.

See the Youtube video for a demonstration of the script in action. This script is available by request only – go to this page to request your copy.

See you at PEPCON 2016 in San Diego

Just a short note to announce myself and Dave Creamer of Ideas Training will be presenting a session at the 2016 PEPCON in San Diego. Our session concerns Data Publishing – the session will cover ways of dealing with variable data with InDesign, advanced techniques and third party plug-ins.

For more details concerning the conference, make sure to visit www.pepcon.com.

We hope to see you there!

 

Next Beta Script: Data Merge Cut and Stack Assistant

As a regular user of Data Merge, I often have to assemble projects that require cut and stack impositions. Most of the time, I prepare my files one-up at the correct size and output to PDF, knowing that the RIP of the digital printer has imposition software that has the ability to prepare cut and stack style impositions.

If cut and stack is an unfamiliar term, it is a style of page imposition where the subsequent pages appear on the sheets below until the end of a stack, and then begin again at the top of the sheet in this continuous pattern.

Unlike bookwork that may have a maximum page count of under 1000 pages, cut and stack impositions can deal with page counts in the hundreds of thousands… enough to make any imposition program buckle.

Another way of handling cut and stack impositions is to prepare the imposed base in Adobe InDesign, and then manipulate the data so that rather than being one long list, the list is split into columns based on the amount of pages-to-view on an imposed sheet. This is a quicker method as there are less pages to process and no imposition software to use, but there is the time taken to split the data appropriately, and will suffer any human error that went into manually making the revised database.

Frustrated with this situation, I decided to create a script that would take a large database and repurpose it for a cut and stack imposition. On that note, I present to you my latest script.

UItoexplainlaststacks
The imposed base is created in Adobe InDesign with text frames in place for the data merge placeholders. The script is then run and prompts the user for the original data. An interface appears asking the user for:

  • The records to process;
  • The amount of records in a set;
  • The amount of sets in a stack;
  • How to process last records (in case the stack sizes are uneven); and
  • Any other identifiers visible in the database.

Once OK is clicked, the script creates a duplicate of the original database and arranges the data appropriately, and launches the Data Merge palette so that the imposed base placeholders can be populated.

basewithfieldcodes

If you would like to test this script, please go to the Contact page and in the comment field, ask for the Data Merge Cut and Stack Assistant script.

Bonus script for the Holidays: Draw arrows around an object

UPDATE 2016-02-22: The script has now been updated to v1.07 and contains some new features. See the video below:

From time to time, one of the boring and repetitive tasks that prepress operators or designers have to do is draw lines that indicate the height and width of the artwork on a proof. For example:

proof form1For some sizes, a template probably exists so that the sizes that are regularly used don’t have to be drawn manually. But there are occasions where the artwork is a unique size and the arrows have to be drawn. It doesn’t take a long time to do the task, but if you’re doing this several times a day, every working day, it gets a little boring.

proof form2

That’s why this year, I’ve released a beta version of the Draw arrows around an object script. It works like this:

In this instance, I would like to apply the measurement arrows around this business card. There is a .25pt keyline that is on the frame, so I have set the stroke to align to the inside edge. Click on the object that you would like to draw the measurement lines around and then run the script from the scripts panel.

proof form3

The script will run, and moments later will return the measurements and the lines.

proof form4

The default font used is Minion, but it can be changed as it has a style associated with it called labelmeasures, so let’s change it to something that matches the style.

proof form5

And we’re done. Some things worth mentioning about the script:

  • It applies the measurements to one object or grouped selection at a time. If several ungrouped objects are selected, the script will add rulers to the object that was placed on the page first.
  • If the object being measured has a keyline applied to it, be sure to set the keyline to the inside edge.
  • It works beyond millimetres, including centimetres, pixels, points and inches.
  • It is a beta, so there is still room for improvement and suggestions. Any feedback about this script (or any others on Colecandoo) can be made on the contact page.

That said, the script is my Holiday gift to readers and followers. Enjoy!

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