Data Merge to Unique Names script updated for ID CC 2018

Just a quick note that if you are a user of the Data Merge to Unique Names script, please note that the script has been updated for InDesign CC 2018. If you have not downloaded the latest version, please do so from the downloads page.

The update fixes a bug that would prevent merging to InDesign files due to a packaging issue. That said, make sure to read the instructions prior to use, particularly if using fonts that are dependent on a Document fonts folder for font usage in the file.


Another Data Merge script: Data merge to batches

This latest script compensates for a feature that should be available in InDesign’s Data Merge feature, but simply doesn’t work.

The problem:

Take for example the following Data Merge file where we want to export a custom range, but prepare PDFs in batches of 50s for production purposes. Each record is one page long.


When the Data Merge feature is used in Adobe InDesign, it is possible to merge to several new InDesign files that contain a maximum amount of records per file. The same dialog box is present when merging directly to PDF as well.


Unfortunately, the Record Limit per Document checkbox may as well be there for decoration, because it doesn’t work. Instead of 13 PDFs being created with the maximum size of each PDF being 50 records long, a PDF the size of the complete merge file is created.


The workaround

It is possible to split the document into ranges 50 pages per PDF, but it has to be done in Acrobat. From here, click the Organize Pages button.


This will show the Organize Pages toolbar.


From here, click on the split icon to show the split pages portion of the toolbar.


With the split pages toolbar now visible, choose the appropriate split by dropdown and edit the amount required. In this case, we need “number of pages” and 50 pages.


The files now need to be saved somewhere. Click the Output Options button to show the Output Options dialog.


Select a destination for the files and any additional filenaming information and click OK.


Once back at the regular toolbar, click the big blue split button.


The task will run and then present a dialog box once it is complete.


On an example such as the one demonstrated, this isn’t an onerous task. However, if working in a production setting where PDF page lengths can be tens of thousands or longer, this is inconvenient and unacceptable.

The solution

Rather than use the Adobe Acrobat solution, I would prefer that the original dialog box worked correctly. One option is to let the Adobe InDesign Engineers know that it should be fixed. A link to the direct request can be found here.

Until it is fixed, I’ve written a free script specifically for this purpose.


Using the earlier example, the same settings will be keyed in.


Once keyed in, click OK. A progress bar will let you know how the merge is going.


An alert will let you know when the merge is complete. The files are then saved to the selected destination with no extra splitting required.


Interested in this script? It can be downloaded from here.

The wall planner script cometh!

In my last article “My Calendar Caffuffle“, I’d mentioned that I was working on a wall planner script for a Christmas release, but due to many factors I was unable to release this script and instead opted for a smaller script that – for many regulars to this site – didn’t really feel like much of a Christmas gift.

To this end, I felt like I let my supporters down and had to make sure that amends were made in the new year. On that note, I was able to work through the issues that held back the script, and I can now release the script free to the public:


This script will create a twelve month planner based on a start month and year, and to an output size in millimetres. There are one of four ways to display the planner based whether the months should appear in rows or columns, and whether the planner should be condensed or expanded. For example:


Before you say “I don’t like the colour”, note that the script creates the necessary styles so that the wall-planner can be tailored to your needs:


Don’t fancy starting the calendar in January? That’s no longer an issue either, the planner can start on any month:


So that’s the free version of the script that can be downloaded from the downloads page now.

Want more? Well, I’m also working on a pro-version of the wall-planner script that will have additional features such as:

  • highlight school days from known dates, a customised range, OR a text file;
  • add events from a text file that contains the dates and events;
  • (in expanded format) begin the planner on any day, not just Monday;
  • highlight cells based on Find/Change or GREP searches;
  • additional formatting options (appearance of months and days).

Screen Shot 2018-03-03 at 22.46.50


Lastly, speaking of pro-versions, I’ve also been busy improving my long-popular Data Merge to Single Record script for its pro-version release. Don’t panic, the free version will remain, but to access features shown in the dialog box below, the pro-version will be a paid release.


If you’re interested in the pro-versions of the scripts mentioned in this article, please contact me through the contact page.

My Calendar Caffuffle

UPDATE 2018-02-24: The script is now working and available from the downloads page. Click here to read more about the script in action.

Around this time of year, I usually get into the festive season by offering a new script for readers of the website. This year, I intended to release a free script that would generate a year planner based on the calendar year, page size and school term dates. After a weekend or so, I’d managed to create a proof of principle script using a Native InDesign Dialog and used it in a live project. Here are some shots of the first iteration of the script, along with the output:



While the script worked, it was not perfect, given that there was no error correction for the date fields, so if values were entered into date fields that weren’t the correct date syntax, the script would return an error. It was at this moment in time that I’d realised something very important:

There’s a difference between Native InDesign Dialogs and ScriptUI

Gabe Harbs has a brilliant write-up about the differences on the InDesign Scripting forums but ultimately it meant that the script would not allow for error correction unless it was rewritten using ScriptUI, something I was hoping to avoid. I’ve begun the re-write of the script but have not proceeded to far as I’m encountering a few issues. Here’s what I have now:


For now, that’s as far as the script has progressed, and this leads onto the second issue:

A busy work schedule that included Adobe MAX


Between October to December is usually very busy as there is seasonal work such as school diaries, yearbooks and other collateral that is wanted by the end of the Australian school year. In addition to this influx of work, I also had the opportunity to attend Adobe MAX 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

During MAX, I’d informed several of my peers about the upcoming script that I’d planned on releasing, only to realise the following:

Schools years, terms and holidays differ between countries

In Australia, the school year starts towards the end of January and ends in the second or third week of December. There are four terms and each state has their own term dates. Within this structure, private schools can also set their own dates, and this usually varies by a week or so of the Government schools. Given that I live in Australia, I’d created the script for use within the rules that apply for Australia.

However, I’d neglected the fact that users in the northern hemisphere have a completely different school year that starts in one calendar year and finishes in the next calendar year. This rendered my script of little to no use to most InDesign users, so for now the script sits on the shelf waiting for a quieter time before I revisit the idea.

I won’t leave you empty-handed!

Despite these setbacks, I still have a festive season gift to bestow: A day to a page planner script. Upon running this script, the user is asked for a start and end date range in ISO date format. When an appropriate date range is chosen and the OK button is clicked, a new InDesign document is made, creating threaded frames that contain a day to a page that contains the correct date.



The script can be downloaded from the downloads page of Colecandoo.

If you are interested in the year planner project discussed in this article, feel free to contact me via my contact page.

Check out the Youtube videos too!

Since 2015, I’ve also been preparing a series of short videos on Youtube that complement the articles already on the Colecandoo website. I plan to release more videos and if you haven’t seen the channel, check it out here.


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