Data Merge to Unique Names script updated for ID CC 2018

Just a quick note that if you are a user of the Data Merge to Unique Names script, please note that the script has been updated for InDesign CC 2018. If you have not downloaded the latest version, please do so from the downloads page.

The update fixes a bug that would prevent merging to InDesign files due to a packaging issue. That said, make sure to read the instructions prior to use, particularly if using fonts that are dependent on a Document fonts folder for font usage in the file.

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My Calendar Caffuffle

Around this time of year, I usually get into the festive season by offering a new script for readers of the website. This year, I intended to release a free script that would generate a year planner based on the calendar year, page size and school term dates. After a weekend or so, I’d managed to create a proof of principle script using a Native InDesign Dialog and used it in a live project. Here are some shots of the first iteration of the script, along with the output:

01oldUI

02oldresult

While the script worked, it was not perfect, given that there was no error correction for the date fields, so if values were entered into date fields that weren’t the correct date syntax, the script would return an error. It was at this moment in time that I’d realised something very important:

There’s a difference between Native InDesign Dialogs and ScriptUI

Gabe Harbs has a brilliant write-up about the differences on the InDesign Scripting forums but ultimately it meant that the script would not allow for error correction unless it was rewritten using ScriptUI, something I was hoping to avoid. I’ve begun the re-write of the script but have not proceeded to far as I’m encountering a few issues. Here’s what I have now:

03newUI

For now, that’s as far as the script has progressed, and this leads onto the second issue:

A busy work schedule that included Adobe MAX

IMAG0547

Between October to December is usually very busy as there is seasonal work such as school diaries, yearbooks and other collateral that is wanted by the end of the Australian school year. In addition to this influx of work, I also had the opportunity to attend Adobe MAX 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

During MAX, I’d informed several of my peers about the upcoming script that I’d planned on releasing, only to realise the following:

Schools years, terms and holidays differ between countries

In Australia, the school year starts towards the end of January and ends at the in the second or third week of December. There are four terms and each state has their own term dates. Within this structure, private schools can also set their own dates, and this usually varies by a week or so of the Government schools. Given that I live in Australia, I’d created the script for use within the rules that apply for Australia.

However, I’d neglected the fact that users in the northern hemisphere have a completely different school year that starts in one calendar year and finishes in the next calendar year. This rendered my script of little to no use to most InDesign users, so for now the script sits on the shelf waiting for a quieter time before I revisit the idea.

I won’t leave you empty-handed!

Despite these setbacks, I still have a festive season gift to bestow: A day to a page planner script. Upon running this script, the user is asked for a start and end date range in ISO date format. When an appropriate date range is chosen and the OK button is clicked, a new InDesign document is made, creating threaded frames that contain a day to a page that contains the correct date.

04dotwmaker

05dotwmakerresult

The script can be downloaded from the downloads page of Colecandoo.

If you are interested in the year planner project discussed in this article, feel free to contact me via my contact page.

Check out the Youtube videos too!

Since 2015, I’ve also been preparing a series of short videos on Youtube that complement the articles already on the Colecandoo website. I plan to release more videos and if you haven’t seen the channel, check it out here.

 

Made it to Adobe Make-it 2017

Moments before the start of MAKE-IT 2017

Moments before the start of MAKE-IT 2017

Between August 2-3, the International Convention Centre in Sydney played host to the Adobe MAKE-IT conference, a gathering of close to 2,000 creatives and design professionals from Australia, New Zealand and beyond. While I was unable to attend the sessions on August 2 as the sessions were sold out, I was lucky enough to attend the conference on August 3 thanks to my employer – Openbook Howden Print & Design – providing me the leave at very short notice, for which I am truly grateful.

Speakers on the day of the conference included several creatives in differing fields including an animator using a variety of media; a conflict-zone photographer; a craft-based designer; a social media “disruptor” and author of the “Sharpie-art Workshop” book; and a self proclaimed “digital hipster”. Other speakers included several Adobe staff, including Adobe evangelists Paul Burnett and Photoshop guru Julieanne Kost.

While there were no jaw-dropping announcements about product releases or upgrades, Adobe did provide glimpses of ongoing upgrades and projects such as Project Felix, Adobe Character Animator, Adobe XD, Lightroom enhancements, Adobe Stock improvements, and a revamp of their Youtube site to make easier to follow tutorials.

The conference also provided me an opportunity to catch up with several speakers who had presented sessions the previous day, and whom I have met before at various CPN conferences such as PEPCON, The InDesign Conference and CreativePro Week.

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Jesús Ramirez, Julieanne Kost, Mark Heaps, Karen Alsop and Colin Flashman at Adobe MAKE-IT 2017. Photo credit: Mark Heaps.

As someone who uses InDesign for most of their work, I was a little deflated that the software barely had a mention during the conference. Nevertheless, programs that were more familiar to the rest of the audience such as Photoshop, Illustrator and After Effects – applications I also use regularly – featured predominantly.

It was great to see so many people both in attendance and watching online, and hope that not only that the event can return next year, but with greater scope to be the “Mini-MAX” event for Australians who can’t necessarily make it to Adobe MAX in the USA.

Quick-tip: rename all links in an InDesign file

When working with difficult clients, it can be tempting to take out some frustration on the clients’ files, such as naming links within a file rather inappropriately. An example would be a picture placed into an InDesign file with the name lousypicture.jpg. Seems harmless enough, but this is a tame example compared to what might be going through your mind as a reader. Also, no – I’ve never done this and I’ve always behaved in a professional manner to my clients.

Seems like harmless enough fun… until the client requests packaged InDesign files of their artwork. Then it’s easy for the client to see all of the inappropriate names that were given to the links in their artwork, and unless they have a sense of humour about it, expect to receive… negative feedback.

If you’ve been in a situation like this and needed to rename all links in a document, then scripter Kasyan Servetsky has an ideal script for you: batch rename and link. Once the script is run, it renames and relinks all links in an InDesign file based on their page number and their position on the page. So a name such as lousypicture.jpg will now become AA_0002_r1.jpg

I’d originally used this script four years ago when I received a strange use-case where a customer wanted the images from their annual report labelled in terms of what pages the images were on, and this script was quite handy for that.

However, I can see the more appropriate use-case of having to rename inappropriate or offensively-named links when handing files over to clients.

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